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Monday, May 11, 2020 | History

5 edition of How much might universal health insurance reduce socioeconomic disparities in health? found in the catalog.

How much might universal health insurance reduce socioeconomic disparities in health?

Sandra Lynn Decker

How much might universal health insurance reduce socioeconomic disparities in health?

a comparison of the US and Canada

by Sandra Lynn Decker

  • 308 Want to read
  • 29 Currently reading

Published by National Bureau of Economic Research in Cambridge, MA .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Canada.,
  • United States.
    • Subjects:
    • National health insurance -- Canada,
    • Medical care -- Canada,
    • Medical care, Cost of -- Government policy -- United States,
    • Insurance, Health -- United States

    • Edition Notes

      StatementSandra L. Decker, Dahlia K. Remler.
      SeriesNBER working paper series ;, working paper 10715, Working paper series (National Bureau of Economic Research : Online) ;, working paper no. 10715.
      ContributionsRemler, Dahlia K., National Bureau of Economic Research.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsHB1
      The Physical Object
      FormatElectronic resource
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL3475769M
      LC Control Number2005615171

        Background: Despite enormous public sector expenditures, the effectiveness of universal coverage for health care in reducing socioeconomic disparities in health has received little attention. Study objectives: To evaluate whether universal coverage for health care reduces socioeconomic disparities in health. Design: Information on participants of the Nova Cited by: Page 3 Demographic Health Disparities and Health System Transformation: Drivers and Solutions, November Community Catalyst is a national non-profit advocacy organization building consumer and community leadership to transform the American health care system. Socioeconomic DisparitiesFile Size: KB.

      Disparities in U.S health care are a source of considerable public health and policy concern, with substantial evidence that minorities and low-income Americans experience greater barriers to care and worse health outcomes across numerous measures. 1,2 At the same time, the.   Obamacare’s impact on the racial health gap comes at a time when other kinds of racial disparities are increasing: The wealth gap between blacks and whites is .

      Part two Health inequalities and disparities in France Higher-resolution analysis of obesity at the level of urban units con- taining more t inhabitants has been conducted. Health Disparities in the United States: Social Class, Race, Ethnicity, and Health is certainly not the only recent publication on health disparities. Similar books in the field tend to focus solely on racial/ethnic disparities or, like Barr's earlier book, 1 are introductory texts on health policy.


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How much might universal health insurance reduce socioeconomic disparities in health? by Sandra Lynn Decker Download PDF EPUB FB2

How Much Might Universal Health Insurance Reduce Socioeconomic Disparities in Health. A Comparison of the US and Canada Sandra L. Decker, Dahlia K. Remler. NBER Working Paper No. Issued in August NBER Program(s):Health Economics.

A strong association between lower socioeconomic status and worse health has been documented within many countries, but little work has been done to compare the strength of this relationship across countries. We compare the strength of the relationship between income and self-reported health in the US and Canada.

We find that being below median income Cited by: How Much Might Universal Health Insurance Reduce Socioeconomic Disparities in Health. A Comparison of the US and Canada Sandra L. Decker and Dahlia K. Remler NBER Working Paper No. August JEL No. I1 ABSTRACT A strong association between lower socioeconomic status (SES) and worse health-- the SES-health.

How Much Might Universal Health Insurance Reduce Socioeconomic Disparities in Health. A Comparison of the US and Canada Article in Applied Health. Downloadable. A strong association between lower socioeconomic status (SES) and worse health-- the SES-health gradient-- has been documented in many countries, but little work has compared the size of the gradient across countries.

We compare the size of the income gradient in self-reported health in the US and Canada. We find that being below median income raises. How much might universal health insurance reduce socioeconomic disparities in health.

Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, © (OCoLC) Material Type: Internet resource: Document Type: Book, Internet Resource: All Authors / Contributors: Sandra Lynn Decker; Dahlia K Remler; National Bureau of Economic Research.

Decker, Sandra L. and Remler, Dahlia, How Much Might Universal Health Insurance Reduce Socioeconomic Disparities in Health. A Comparison of the Us and Canada (August ).

NBER Working Paper No. wCited by: Get this from a library. How Much Might Universal Health Insurance Reduce Socioeconomic Disparities in Health.

A Comparison of the US and Canada. [Sandra L Decker; Dahlia K Remler] -- A strong association between lower socioeconomic status (SES) and worse health-- the SES-health gradient-- has been documented in many countries, but little work has compared the. Universal Access to Care Does Not Fully Eliminate Disparities, Study Finds.

Universal access to medical care might reduce health disparities between socioeconomic classes, but it is unlikely to eliminate them, according to a study published in the February issue of Health Affairs, MedPage Today reports. Study Methods. Kawachi et al. noted that “Much of the history of thinking about inequality in the United States, including health inequality, has usually been framed in terms of race or class, but seldom both.” 66(p) The absence of adequate data on socioeconomic differences overall and within racial/ethnic groups can lead policymakers, researchers, and.

Accordingly, the reduction of socioeconomic and racial/ethnic disparities in health has been identified by the U.S. Public Health Service and the National Institutes of Health as a major priority for public health practice and research in the first decade of the twenty-first century (USDHHS, ; Varmus, ).Cited by: Findings from the CDC Health Disparities and Inequalities Report – United States, Now, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued the CDC Health Disparities and Inequalities Report — United States,which is the first in a series of regular reports that focus on selected topics that are important to CDC’s efforts to eliminate Size: KB.

to address population health disparities. In addition, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has boldly expanded their Healthy People objectives from reducing health disparities to the elimination of health disparities by (USDHHS, ).

Health disparities, represented by differences in the incidence, prevalence, andFile Size: 50KB. 10 The four studies are (1) R.M. Weinick, S.H. Zuvekas, and J.W. Cohen, “Racial and Ethnic Differences in Access to and Use of Health Care Services, to ,” Medical Care Research and Cited by: The United States has the largest socioeconomic disparities in health care access of any wealthy country.

We assessed changes in these disparities in Cited by: Disparities in health within the U.S. Why is it that in the U.S., where you live can have a huge impact on your health.

For example, in the area served by the Washington, D.C., metro system, neighborhoods just 12 miles from each other can have a nine-year difference in life expectancy. disparities in health can occur not only as inequalities in quality of and access to medical care but also as inequalities related to behaviors, environmental conditions, and societal opportunities.

For example, differences in individual behaviors that result in greater risk for disease or injury (such asFile Size: 8MB. While new health technologies are indisputably beneficial, the uneven distribution of access to them has generated a massive intensification of health disparities.

T Age-adjusted rates that account for differences in population age structures are usually used to compare mortality rates in two or more populations.

Research showing that addressing health disparities would greatly reduce the health care costs of this nation is hardly new, as a cursory review of the literature indicates.

A study of diabetes in North Carolina showed that the prevalence of diabetes was 9 percent overall but 76 percent among adult Medicaid enrollees. Social determinants of health like poverty, unequal access to health care, lack of education, stigma, and racism are linked to health disparities. Health in the United States is a complex and often contradictory issue.

One the one hand, as one of the wealthiest nations, the United States fares well in health comparisons with the rest of the world. In the South, African Americans are disproportionately represented. According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of Minority Health, 58 percent of the African-American population lived in the South as of 18 They are also more likely to be uninsured, with Texas, Florida, and Georgia being home to the largest shares of uninsured .The cover of Disparities on the Path to Universal Health Coverage may look familiar to some observers of global health trends.

While the image is generated using the data underpinning this report, its “bubble chart” form is strongly asso-ciated with Dr. Hans Rosling. Dr. Rosling, who passed away on February 7, while.Federal efforts to alleviate such health disparities began in the early s.

The focus of this report is the collaboration between the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the National Institute of Health’s (NIH’s) National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD), which supports these federal efforts.